Artists-in-Residence Have Officially Landed in Tulsa

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Nine of the 12 chosen for the inaugural Tulsa Artists Fellowships during a reception at 108 Contemporary in the Brady District in Tulsa, OK, Jan. 8, 2016. (front, from left) Molly Dilworth, Chris Ramsay, Alice Leora Briggs, Nick Vaughan (back, from left) Clarissa Rizal, Eric Sall, Akiko Jackson, Rena Detrixhe and Crystal Z. Campbell. Not pictured are Gary Kachadourian, Monty Little and Nathan Young. Photo courtesy: Michael Wyke/Tulsa World

Now that we have been caught on camera and advertised in the local newspaper “Tulsa World”, everyone can agree that we have officially landed in Tulsa!  Click here to read about the inaugural Tulsa Artist Residency 2016

Checking Out the Philbrook Museum

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We rode the trolley to the Phibrook Museum

Only recently in the past few years have I come to appreciate museums.  We must understand that I was not born to a culture who kept old objects staging stagnant in an old building.  In fact, when I was a child, I literally thought museums were haunted houses.  They were dark, windowless, lifeless nooks and crannies where all the objects collected dust which made the pieces even look older and scarier!

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The ceiling of the Philbrook entry

Fortunately, with every generation of new directors and curators, we have evolved to where we are today with museums being much more active, inviting locals and visitors alike to partake in rotating exhibits and special events in spaces that have included much more light!

The Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, Oklahoma is an art museum housed in part in a 1920s villa, situated on 23 acres of formal and informal gardens.  The original structure is the former home of Oklahoma oil pioneer Waite Phillips and his wife Genevieve (Elliott) Phillips.

The museum opened October 25, 1939. It was known as the Philbrook Art Center until 1987, when the name was changed to Philbrook Museum of Art.[2] The collection housed at the Philbrook Museum of Art includes works fromGiovanni Bellini,[3] William-Adolphe Bouguereau, William Merritt Chase, Leonardo Drew, Arturo Herrera, Charles Loloma,Maria Martinez, Thomas Moran, Pablo Picasso, Fritz Scholder, Tanzio da Varallo, Rachel Whiteread, and Andrew Wyeth. A satellite facility, Philbrook Downtown, opened on June 14, 2013 in Tulsa’s Brady Arts District.

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Curator of Modern Art at the Philbrook, Sienna Brown, introduces the “Camoflauge” hand-silkscreened prints by Andy Warhol

The Philbrook Museum is beautiful.  How come; did anyone warn me about its beauty?  I don’t remember.  The history of this museum is just as fascinating as the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa too (of which I will include a blog post about when I go visit the Gilcrease (http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ok-gilcreasemuseum.html).

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The outdoor garden of the Philbrook Museum, Tulsa, OK — the fountains were fantastic!

I am always fascinated by the design of buildings.  I especially enjoy old architecture influenced by Europe, especially Italy.  Instead of posting photos of some of the beautiful art in the Philbrook Collection, I have posted a few shots of this building.  You must visit the collection of art in the Philbrook.

Click here to read about the fascinating history of the Philbrook Museum

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The Italian-style architecture of the Philbrook

In the near future, I intend on doing a couple of presentations/demonstrations in Chilkat weaving both at the Gilcrease and at the Philbrook.  I just have to get settled into the vibe of Tulsa, talk to the directors, and set the date(s).

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Christina Burke explains the old dance floor that changed colors every few seconds in the Philbrook Museum

Notice the dance floor colors in these three photos.  Golly, I’d love to design and build a home/studio/ballroom that has a dance floor with changing colors!

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Making That Move

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The U-Haul was packed by a team of movers under the guidance of musician Eric Wade (the tall one)…

It’s not a rumor; I am moving to Tulsa, Oklahoma for a “job” for the entire year of 2016.   Selected as 1 of 12 inaugural artists from across the nation, the newly-formed Tulsa Artist Residency provides me a one-bedroom apartment which also serves as my studio and TAR provides me a monthly stipend that pretty much pays all my personal bills.  I call TAR my modern-day “sugar daddy” — total support while I do my art and living my life!

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With a landmark like this, know we’re in Texas !

Yes, I actually hired movers to pack my U-Haul for me; this is the very first time I’ve ever hired help to do the heavy lifting.  All the times I have moved across this continent and have never thought of hiring out.  Being too old to move heavy objects is what got my mind to think properly:  hire someone else to do the heavy work!

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The contractors did not have the elevator completely installed yet, so the movers hauled everything up two flights of stairs…!

These three guys at “Two Guys and a Truck” were my movers.  Very professional, efficient and cordial; check them out on Facebook!  Left to Right:  Jacob, Jerry, and Cory…

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“Two Guys & A Truck” Moving Company — The owner Jerry (Center) with his two guys Jacob (L) and Cory (R) — For a tip, I gave them each one of my prints of their choosing…!

I’ve officially landed in Tulsa!

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“Two Men and a Truck” — Tulsa, Oklahoma—The three guys took 3.5 hours to unload…!

 

Grandma Leaves Home at 60

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The beginning of a White Christmas

Carefully

She places white teacups into incubation

For two

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Good omen: A single raven flies over the house towards me as I snap this shot

22 years I have lived and worked in this home away from home.   The U-Haul is packed.  Getting the last remnants of possessions tucked into the cabby.  Cleaning up the studio that will be used by my daughter and her husband.  I leave this studio with no intentions of ever living here again.  I go to Tulsa for at least a year to live and work being totally supported by the Tulsa Artist Residency program.  Like awesome Alaska, it is not easy to leave beautiful Colorado.  The hardest part is leaving behind my young grand-daughters and my kids.

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Clarissa’s favorite trellised walkway

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Clarissa’s Winter Wonderland

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Clarissa’s Colorado Studio out back has served her well especially for the past 4.5 years

 

The View Out Back

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From the back yard Looking North to the San Juan Mountains first hard frost, Pagosa Springs, Colorado – October 2015

Every day (that I am not in Alaska), the past 22 years I look to these Mountains out back.

I look at them as if they will move.

In a way they do move.

They move me.

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First snow of the year, the view out back looking North to the San Juan Mountains, Pagosa Springs, Colorado – moving into December 2015

Hard to imagine living anywhere without the mountains.  I am about to do that for at least a year in Oklahoma.  How will I manage without these pillars of grounded strength?  We’ll see….

 

“Rock the Cradle” Concert for Pagosa Charter School

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“Rock the Cradle” Poster design and layout by Ursala Hudson – painting by Ursala and her dad, Bill Hudson

Last year in 2014, my daughter Ursala Hudson decided a charter school in Pagosa Springs, Colorado was a necessary addition to the community, especially now that she had two little girls of her own and was thinking into the future about their educational experience.

 

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During concert practice, Clarissa’s granddaughter Simone Haas takes her first shot at the microphone with the support of singer Jen Toggle

Ursala was home-schooled until she was 9 years old; by 8th grade she was President of her class; before she graduated she already started her own web design business.  It was only befitting she formed a Board of Directors, drafted up her outline, and submitted their application to the Colorado Department of Education with the hopes that they had met all their requirements and the DOE was inspired to assist her and a small group of other interested parents to begin their path towards the creation of this endeavor.  A few months later, they received affirmation of a three-year grant for research to visit other Charter schools in Colorado, and to help get their own act together to open Pagosa’s own charter school in the Fall of 2017!

This past spring, Ursala had mentioned to me that she and her dad were thinking of doing an awareness concert sometime this Fall for the charter school.  She asked if I wanted to re-write a cover tune and would I be willing to perform it.  I asked her what kind of re-write to what kind of song and before she could answer, I gave her an example and began to sing other words to the famous Beatle song “Hey Jude”….It began like this: “Hey Blue, don’t make it red, take a sad song and make it yellow…remember, the world was meant to be green, so we could be, completely mellow…”

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A lemonade stand provided refreshments for concert-goers

The “Rock the Cradle” concert was held Saturday, November 14th at the Pagosa Center for the Arts; it was a benefit for the Pagosa Charter School to bring awareness to the community of Pagosa Springs that this school is in the formation process!

Big thanks to the Pagosa Center for the Arts for generously donating their space for this concert!

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Pagosa Springs Charter School Board of Directors at the admissions table:  Ursala Hudson, Megan Riddle and Laura Hamilton

The benefit concert was produced and directed by Ursala and her father, Bill Hudson.  They gathered together a group of volunteers and put together a band of local musicians to play for free:  guitarists included Steve Sarkis, Steve Summers, Greg Millioto, and Bill Hudson; drummer D.C. Duncan, key board Venita Burch, and bass player Jarrett Hebert.  Lead and back up singers included Lisa Saunders, Jen Toggle, Chris Haas, Greg Millioto, Bill Hudson, D.C. Duncan, Geoffrey Andrews, Ursala Hudson, Jen Sarkis and Clarissa Rizal.

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In the audience, Jen Sarkis and Drie Young with their baby boys Shaydon and Wyatt

The concert was a huge success, standing room only, unfortunately, people were turned away at the door!   On behalf of my daughter, Ursala Hudson and the Pagosa Springs Charter School Board of Directors, thank you to all who came to the concert!  Truly, the support is appreciated!

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Chris Haas, Ursala Hudson, Jen Toggle, Geoffrey Andrews and Lisa Saunders

About the Pagosa Charter School:

“The Pagosa Charter Initiative is a non-profit group dedicated to providing a public elementary school option to families in Pagosa Springs, Colorado.

Our vision is to form a school that will foster creative, self-sufficient children with inquisitive minds. We are committed to providing an alternative learning environment that nurtures and engages our community’s children through outdoor education, hands-on projects, and community involvement, while continuing to align with state educational standards.

We believe that exploring subjects through participation in natural environments not only strengthens student achievement, but also inevitably supports community vitality and healthy environments. The opportunity to observe, solve problems, and participate in real-life scenarios fosters life-long learners who are socially responsible, and have a strong sense of purpose. Click here to read our core values.

The group was formed in December of 2014 by several dedicated individuals wanting to invest in our community and children through education. Please contact us if you are interested in helping out, and/or join our mailing list to keep up-to-date with our progress.”

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4 Guitarists and the drummer, L to R: Bill Hudson, Steven Summers, Greg Millioto, Steve Sarkis and D.C. Duncan

For more information on the Pagosa Charter School, check out their website at:  http://pagosacharterschool.com/

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Check out the stature of these guitarists…LOL…!

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The familiar audience of little people!!!

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Bill Hudson, Jarrett Heber, Jen Toggle, Ursala Hudson and Jen Sarkis

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Greg Millioto on lead guitar, D.C. on drums — doesn’t get any better than that in this town of Pagosa Springs

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Professional singers Lisa Saunders and Geoffrey Andrews sing a most recent Disney duet “A Whole New World”

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Chris, Jenn, Ursala, Jeff

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Big sister Amelie Haas hugs her Simone during a break between songs

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Check out this passion and fun of singing and performing…!

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Brothers Ross and D.C. Duncan perform a poetry skit

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Clarissa’s youngest daughter, Ursala Hudson, President of the Pagosa Charter School

 

Clarissa’s Halloween Costume

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Clarissa wears her 2015 Halloween costume (all photos by Lis Saya)

It’s been a few years since I went out on the town for Halloween.  It was once my favorite “holiday.”  A costume designer since I was a little girl, Halloween was at the top in dressing up for any occasion!  This costume came together by “accident.”

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The pink, pleated cape has an 11-foot “wing span”

I borrowed the headdress from my daughter’s friend, Drie Young, who is a clothing designer and currently sells vintage clothing on eBay at Ghost Rabbit.  This fantastic cape was borrowed from my daughter who had recently received it as a gift.  The plastic pink necklace was borrowed from my grand-daughter.  A few months ago, I was in a second hand store and bought a pair of black, faux leather, hi-top, 8″ platform boots with tons of buckles.  All the accessories were from my own personal stock.  I put together this costume in 5 minutes.  Voile’…when others saw my costume and the dance I did in this cape, I was told that I could have won several Best Costume awards at various venues around town had I known about them…!

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Feathered head dress, glittered rhinestone eyelashed mask, beaded Mother-of-Pearl inlay earrings, black lipstick, plastic hot pink necklace, beaded/buttoned black leather fringed belt, a pair of old cashmere gloves worn down to the skin, turquoise beaded cuffs,with purple pink glued-on nails, accessorize the normal “beaded” dress

I even performed wearing this costume during the closing ceremony dance of the “Clan Conference” at Centennial Hall last night.  Though I wore my traditional beaded dance tunic over this cotton dress.  Elder David Katzeek saw me walk in during the traditional dancing and he immediately motioned me to come up and dance with all the dancers!  It was a kick!  Nobody knew who I was and that is always the best part of Halloween!  Because I was wearing 8″ platform boots, I was 5’10” and nobody realized that I was Clarissa Rizal…hahahaha!  So much fun!

Though after I had gone out on the town dancing to various live bands, I realized that I totally enjoyed being taller.  I realized that the Western world was made for people who were about 5’7 to 6′ tall.  In fact almost everyone is about that height.   Alas, I am back to being 5’2″.  Sigh…

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On a cold, surprisingly dry Halloween night in Juneau, time for some warm seaweed salad!

 

 

 

 

Newly-Remodeled Digs

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The apartment is being remodeled; yep, good light creates better work!

It’s been over 4 years since I’ve lived in a place that has running water, sewer and sufficient heat.  It will be luxury living when I work in this space!

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The layout of the apartment

I was so excited about having my own home again, even though I had all kinds of other business work of deadlines, I couldn’t think of anything else but to do the layout of my space.  For those of you who know me well, you know I like interior (as well as exterior) design work.  I spent 6 hours measuring all my furniture and equipment, then drawing the pieces to scale (1 square = 1 foot), and then doing the layout.  I did several layouts until I came to this one that I felt good about.

I forgot to label the zigzag as the Japanese soji screen which is seen when walking into the apartment hallway looking towards the livingroom.

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close-up of the work space

For a year I am privileged to live in a bright, spacious, warm space with a real kitchen and real bathroom(!)  provided for me by the Tulsa Artist Residency while I work, work, work on many, many projects.  Thank you George Kaiser Foundation and TAR for choosing me for this opportunity.  Truly, Gunalcheesh, ho, ho!

 

 

 

Artists’ Booths at Cherokee Art Market

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Clarissa Rizal’s booth at the 10th Annual Cherokee Art Market at the Hard Rock Casino ballroom, Catoosa, Oklahoma

On Friday night just before the Saturday/Sunday Cherokee Art Market, directly after my assistant Emily and I set up my booth, we walked around to take a look at the works of other artists in the show.  Sure I was interested in the creations of the artists’ work, but I was more intrigued with HOW each individual artist displayed their work.  I was drawn to the professional image each one had created within the use of their 10’x10′ space (though others had a 10’x20′ space).  Out of 150+ artists’ booths, the following are a few of that I made note:

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Jackie Sevier’s booth used custom-built, wooden print racks whose carpeted stands also served as the travel containers. Take note of the curtained space; a place to keep the portable “office” and storage of packing material

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Bill & Traci Rabbit;s double booth features brilliant paintings. I took note of what I think is their “storage unit” front center stage!

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The pottery of Carolyn Bernard Young is beautiful and simple displayed on carpeted shelving with a “front counter desk” flanked by a set of shelves on both sides which housed her packing and shipping supplies, additional stock of pottery, and of course her snacks for the day!

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Sculptor Uptown Greyshoes Ethelbah’s free-standing columns defined the perimeters of his 10’x10′ booth. His vertical banner to the left telescoped into an aluminum frame

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Straight forward like his work, Jerry Ingram mounted long bough branches from his walls from which hung his satchels, beaded garments and accessories to help create a semi-circular feel to his booth

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Kimberly G. Bugg’s booth felt like I walked into a traditional trading post.  By hanging the leather war shirt crossing the corners, she also softened the corners of her 10’x10′ booth

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Daniel Corey’s leather masks hung from grey carpeted walls. He defined the perimeters of his 10’x10′ booth with a “desk” covered with black cloth and the most cushy director’s chair I’ve ever seen

 

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Elizabeth and Michael Kirk’s color scheme in their light-weight shelving, desk, vanity, and director’s chairs are black and turquoise. Touches of silver and turquoise are even in the stuffed display of shopping bags

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Ron Mitchell’s booth was ultimately my favorite. Why? He defined his space by the rack of prints (under the red cloth) next to his small portable drafting table with a clamp lamp and director’s chair

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I just loved Karen and Martha Berry’s line up of three director’s chairs to define the right side of their 10’x10′ booth

 

A 70-Year Rizal Legacy

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70 years this house has been kept in the Rizal side of our family. Inflated taxes has forced my cousins to sell and move.  Not easy.

Because of my name change, many people think I re-married.  No, when I divorced I dropped Hudson so I dropped my married name of Hudson and was left with my middle name as my last:  Rizal.  Yes, I am a direct relative of Jose’ Rizal, the Filipino martyr who inadvertently led the Phillipines to independence of Spanish rule.  Jose’ was uncle to my grandmother Patricia Rizal.

Patricia (Rizal) Lampe arrived in Seattle in August 1945.  By the U.S. Army, she was guaranteed her husband, Fred Lampe’s West Seattle home when she arrived with their remaining five children.  To their surprise Fred’s siblings sold the house as soon as they discovered the news that their brother had died in the Japanese concentration camp in the Phillipines; they did not want the house to be left to the “mucks” or dark-skinned.  My grandfather’s family was left homeless.

Eventually destiny would have it that a house in the Capital Hill district was up for sale.  Taking pity upon the family, a benefactor friend bought the house for them under contract which the Rizal family eventually paid off.

Though I only visited my grandmother, all my uncles and aunts and cousins and 2nd cousins and other relatives of the Filipino Jewish side on the average once a year since I was 14, I have had many memories in this home.  And most recently I spent my last two nights with my 69-year-old cousin and her husband amongst the boxes and boxes of memories.

I witnessed the aged walls cracked as if desiring to speak of all the secrets held within about to be completely demolished and refurbished by the new tenant.  The floors creaked at the light weight of my footsteps slipping past the bedrooms of my cousins and my cousins and my cousins.  We talked until the wee hours of the morning reminiscing of our parents, aunts, uncles, and cousins over food; always over food we discussed politics.  (My father’s side of the family is very political and quite outspoken.)

Letting go of a home due to the inability to keep up with the rising taxes is a real shame.  I noticed that many of the older couples who once lived next doors and across the street are no longer; a new generation of kids have shared the block.  They are the ones who can afford to pay the mortgage AND the taxes.  It is a shame the western culture does not provide a tax break with the consideration to the elderly because many would like to remain in their homes until their death.

My cousin was born and raised in this home 69 years ago, just a year after my Grandmother bought it.   Last weekend, with her brother, husband and son, she moved into a 2-bedroom condo on Seattle’s south side.  As usual with the Rizal/Lampe/Villaflor/Edwards’ traditional hospitality, she extends an invite for me to come stay whenever I come through Seattle.  That hospitality is part of the way things were way before the legacy of the 17th avenue home, and no matter what town or country we live, no matter what house, and no matter what age, or what time in history, it’s the way that hospitality will remain.